The Historian

January 31, 2012

“In 1876, I moved my herd into the Panhandle, following an old Indian trail, which led into the banks between canyon Blanco and the main canyon Palo Duro, where we came to the cap rock. The descent was so abrupt and steep that we were compelled to take our wagons to pieces, first unloading them, and let them down into the valley below the ropes.”

-Charles Goodnight

Excerpt from Pioneer Days in the Southwest by Emanuel Dubbs

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A New Beginning

January 23, 2012

After living on the open range and driving thousands of head of cattle across a new trail with partner Oliver Loving, Charles Goodnight married Mary Ann “Molly” Dyer and settled in Southern Colorado. After the panic of 1873, Goodnight owned 2,000 head of cattle and little else. He and Molly left Colorado with a few teamsters and the cattle and made their way to Palo Duro Canyon. The nearest outpost was 200 miles away, but Charles, Molly, their crew, and cattle found refuge and a new beginning. 

Young Charles Goodnight

January 23, 2012

Young Charles Goodnight

Charles Goodnight in his early years.